oranges & apples

MINKS, “ARK OF LIFE” DEMO

It’s hardly surprising that fans of Minks’ 2011 album, By the Hedge, are feeling conflicted about the newly released Tides End. The debut LP was all goth and shoegaze-tinged walks through rain-slicked cemeteries, while Tides End is a glossy, extroverted affair.

Those wondering how a more introspective version of Tides End may have sounded will be interested in this early take on “Ark of Life,” oddly released under the moniker Jumanji some time ago.

New (and somewhat less new) music for Mid-May.

Daycones, “Walking In The Air”

Daycones is Ryan Janke, a Milwaukee dude with an interesting take on bedroom psych. Opting out of detached irony and self-conscious freakyness, which have almost become lo-fi norms at this point, he wrote a naively pretty song called “Walking In the Air,” (one that might fit nicely on AM radio, slotted between the Everly Brothers and Lee Hazlewood) and let it decompose into a miasma of spectral, unpretentious pop.

Minks, “Painted Indian Demo”

 

With the newly released single “Painted Indian" making the rounds, it seems like a perfect time to share this — a skeletal version of the song that main Minks man Sean Kilfoyle quietly posted last year. More rare tracks from Minks to come.

So many excellent new songs/reissues since the last mix, it’s high time for a new one.

Erros Mágicos, “C’est Tout Noir”

The ye-ye pop song that Fela Kuti never made.

Worries, “Shy”

Don’t know much about Worries, aside from the fact that he began releasing pillowy jangle pop at the end of 2012. File between the Radio Dept. and the first Wild Nothing album.

White Fence, “Fragility”

Just wrote in the neighborhood of 800 words extolling the virtues of White Fence’s ‘Cyclops Reap’ for Impose Magazine. And here’s a few more syllables for “Fragility,” a b-side to the ‘Cyclops’ single “Pink Gorilla.”

The ultra-breathy “Fragility” finds Tim Presley operating somewhere in the Cosmic American galaxy, sounding kind of like the ghost of Gram Parsons hovering somewhere over the Joshua Tree National Forest. However, this isn’t as strictly twangy as some tracks we’ve heard from White Fence in the past. In fact, it actually consolidates many of Presley’s strengths: he creates a paisley-spangled atmosphere that’s subtly immersive, writes some casually surreal (and/or lysergic) lyrics and muscles in a bit of White Light/White Heat distortion without derailing the generally floaty vibe. Chalk it up as one more gem from the walking/singing/tripping one-man Nuggets collection that is White Fence.

Flyying Colours, “Wavygravy”

Not sure what’s going on in Melbourne, but interesting new bands from that coastal city seem to be surfacing regularly. Take Flyying Colours. Their new song, “Wavygravy,” is firmly rooted in the classic shoegaze sound, and it would probably be impossible to write about them at length without mentioning My Bloody Valentine. Yet at the center of “Wavygravy,” there’s a daisy chain of a chorus swirling about that could have been pulled from a bubblegum psych-pop track circa the Summer of Love.

I was lucky enough to conduct folk legend Vashti Bunyan’s first interview in several years. We talked about her memories of Nick Drake and the possibility of new music, amongst other things. Here are a few highlights:
On Nick Drake: 
“He seemed like a mysterious, black-clad and unknowable figure to me – a beautiful boy — almost unreal.”
“Nick was a genius and I’m sure knew it – and that must have caused so much of his pain.”
Regarding the creation of Just Another Diamond Day:
"I was a very solitary musician and sought no others out.”
Head over to the London site The Line of Best Fit to read the rest.

I was lucky enough to conduct folk legend Vashti Bunyan’s first interview in several years. We talked about her memories of Nick Drake and the possibility of new music, amongst other things. Here are a few highlights:

On Nick Drake: 

“He seemed like a mysterious, black-clad and unknowable figure to me – a beautiful boy — almost unreal.”

“Nick was a genius and I’m sure knew it – and that must have caused so much of his pain.”

Regarding the creation of Just Another Diamond Day:

"I was a very solitary musician and sought no others out.”

Head over to the London site The Line of Best Fit to read the rest.